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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, apart from having snow tyres fitted are there any other tips people can share for driving a RWD BMW on snow and ice? I've always had FWD cars previously so quite curious as to how this winter will go.

I've heard filling the boot with heavy items helps

Anything else??

Thanks in advance
 

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You nailed the primary must-have in winter tires. You should be good with tires and rwd unless you live in a heavy snow prone area like myself where awd is needed for getting around on a daily basis.
 

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get used to counter steering, RWD is inherantly tail happy in the snow so get used to using counter steering to keep yourself level. Do be weary of over compensation though, because you can go from counter steer to snap over steer if you over react.

Just be gentle, dont out drive your advantages thats all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for info.

We don't get loads of snow but that's kind of the problem- local councils that salt the roads tend to get caught out and roads are horrendous for a few days.

Hopefully with decent tyres it should be fine- if not there's always the wife's FWD Audi A1. She's got a nice pair of winter walking boots haha!
 

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good winter tires, and even more importantly. Knowing the limits of traction - WHICH MEANS - driving at appropriate speeds in the snow, and taking turns at the approporiate speeds. Have THROTTLE CONTROL. You have to realize that your throttle and steering inputs is what keeps your tires from slipping and sliding out of control.

So manage both wisely

Truth be told. I drove one year on high performance summer tires (yes I am an idot)

But I survived by understanding what I can do and what I cant do.

Did I get stuck? Of course... Lots of times.. But I never lost control of the car because I was gentle with my steering and throttle and I understand where the limits of traction where with my bald tires - and I stayed very far away from that limit :)
 

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What has helped me with driving a sports car in winter was getting a set of winter tires, even if they're the cheapest set you can find, they will be far better than running all seasons.

All season tires in extreme cold won't be as grippy as they are in warmer temperatures, this is why you need winter tires, they stay soft in cold temperatures and as a result still grip good enough.

After that, find a big parking lot with snow, and learn how to control your car when it gets out of control, so this is where the fun happens....GO DRIFTING.
 

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Truth be told. I drove one year on high performance summer tires (yes I am an idot)

:)
I was lazy and waited too long to take off the summers. There was some light snow on the road. As I was driving on a decline, I couldn't stop, even with ABS. The car slid until I hit a dry patch. The scary thing was, an old lady was walking her dog in front of me. I leaned on my horn and got lucky. Never again!
 

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Having driven BMW's since 2006 my advice is: Don't.

If you really must and do not have winter tyres then knock traction control off and crawl....C.R.A.W.L... in as high a gear as possible.

My 320 coupe was better in the snow than my 320si saloon....but neither were happy about driving in the snow.
 

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well you need snows because pretty much all BMWs come with summers, not all seasons. You can get away with all seasons but straight summers are stressful.
 

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I'm driving a 428i RWD with M sport suspension in Canada with BMW approved winter tires. We get snow and we get lots of cold weather. Comparing the 428 to my old 328 RWD the difference is stark. My 328 never ever lost control no matter how much snow and ice was on the road, the 428 fish tails, the traction control is constantly on and it's impossible to stop on ice. The 328 was always in control, never fish tailed and I have seen traction control go on about a dozen times in 4 years. They don't make them like they used to!
 

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I'm driving a 428i RWD with M sport suspension in Canada with BMW approved winter tires. We get snow and we get lots of cold weather. Comparing the 428 to my old 328 RWD the difference is stark. My 328 never ever lost control no matter how much snow and ice was on the road, the 428 fish tails, the traction control is constantly on and it's impossible to stop on ice. The 328 was always in control, never fish tailed and I have seen traction control go on about a dozen times in 4 years. They don't make them like they used to!
Not bad at all, and I think recently you guys got it really bad, so that must have been a big test as to how that combination of yours works.

What winter tires are you running?
 

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Yeah, don't! Seriously though. I've owned 2002's. 320i's and now a 2014 435 Vert and to my continuing surprise all of my experiences in snow with ANY Bimmer have been far less than satisfying. too light and needs more weight in the rear for sure, they tend to plow and don't track well in anything over 1-2". Don't they have snow in Germany?
 

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Wow, all sorts of stories.
Interesting.
Everyone has their own perspective and history.
To be sure, if your Bimmer has just RWD your most important physical need is true winter tires. There are many good ones, we've had very good experience with Bridgestone Blizzaks. After that it's mostly about you.
We certainly don't get winters here like the folks up north but our 6-10 ice storms each year along with a few 4"-8" snows have a way of teaching one to drive 'patiently' and deliberately. Plan ahead. Think ahead.
Yes, throw a little weight in the boot but it's mainly about using your head and like mentioned earlier, get a little practice (in a safe place) learning your car's manners before you need to know them.

It often works well to drive in higher gears than normal. On ice I usually start out in 2nd and move into third within a few feet. This low RPM along with Gentle throttle management help avoid wheel-spin and fishtailing. The rest is just common sense.

In recent years we've been spoiled as we've had BMWs with xDrive and we've never been 'stuck' in one. We've run nothing but all-seasons on these vehicles. I've pushed through snow halfway up to the headlights, negotiated more miles on ice than any sane person should and driven in -20 degrees F ... on all-seasons. However, Blizzaks on the xDrives would be even better.

Someone above said that his 4-series didn't do as well in snow as a prior 3-series. Our experience with E39s, E46s, E90s, X3s and now a 428xi has been pretty consistent. There are certainly things about the newer generations that we don't like as well as the earlier cars but they still get us around quite nicely.

Enjoy the ride.
.
 

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Winter is just around the bend and it may be time to get my ride winter ready. I just change the tires and call it a day. Usually that's enough unless the freak ice storm happens again.
 

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Winter is just around the bend and it may be time to get my ride winter ready. I just change the tires and call it a day. Usually that's enough unless the freak ice storm happens again.
Totally depends where you live. In the city the roads are cleared pretty regularly so its not like you;d have to have some more extreme solutions, like maybe you'd have t if you live in a more rural area.
 

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just hannnggg it out yo... dont be afraid if the back end waggles a bit. traction control can be your friend...
 

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From Canada and snow tires + extremely careful driving is enough. Doubt anyone will be driving in the freak ice storm or snow storm we had last year. I usually hibernate anyways and stock up my freezer for the winter.
Yes, I may be a bear.
 
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