Car Window Tinting - BMW 4-Series Forums
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 5 Old 03-06-2017, 07:33 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Dubai
Posts: 28
(Thread Starter)
Car Window Tinting

I know most of you have great knowledge about this so what are the things to consider when we're going to have a window car tint?
Russell Getta is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 5 Old 05-19-2017, 06:00 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 6
Dealership will help you in this matter. ..
EliGoldman is offline  
post #3 of 5 Old 05-21-2017, 06:10 AM
Junior Member
 
Greg Campbell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Dubai
Posts: 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by EliGoldman View Post
Dealership will help you in this matter. ..
Can you help me in this matter? Is it really worth it to have a car window tinting?
Greg Campbell is offline  
 
post #4 of 5 Old 05-23-2017, 06:18 AM
Junior Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 6
You'll need a window-tint-film application solution, a lint-free cleaning cloth, a razor knife, a scraper blade, an application squeegee, and a heat gun. Find a dust-free place to work in (such as a garage) and avoid doing the job in excessive heat or cold or on a day with high humidity. And most important, check state laws online to find out which windows can legally be tinted and how dark you can make them.
Apply the application solution to the inside of the window. Don't over-spray onto the door trims.

Run the scraper blade across the window from side to side, starting from the top and gently working your way down the window. This will remove any dust, grime, and debris. Be careful not to gouge the glass with the blade.

Run the squeegee across the window from side to side, starting from the top and working down the window to remove any leftover debris and solution.
Put the application solution on the outside of the window and roll the tint film over the window with the protective-film layer facing upward. The solution will hold the film in place while you cut it to size, but will allow you to maneuver the film to make a precise cut.

Run the squeegee over the tint to make sure it doesn't move.

For sliding windows, roll the window down from the door frame about a quarter of an inch and cut the top and sides of the film to shape, using the window as a template. Round the edges off using your finger as a guide.

Slide the film up about half an inch before cutting along the bottom of the window, using the window gasket as a template. This will ensure coverage beyond the base of the window. For non-sliding windows, use the window gaskets as a template and cut the film right to the edges. Spray the inside of the window with the application solution.

Fix the film to the corner of the window with a piece of clear tape and start to peel the protective liner from the film. Spay the adhesive surface of the film with application solution as you peel. Discard the protective liner and remove the film from the outside of the window and place it on the inside of the window. Fold the bottom edge back onto itself to avoid it touching the door trim.

Move the tint into place at the top of the window, leaving a 1/8-inch gap from the top of any sliding window. Run the squeegee along the top of the window, pushing any air and water out of the top as you go.

Roll up the window and spray the film again with application solution. Use the squeegee to hold the window gasket out while sliding the film in underneath it. Use the squeegee to push all the air and water out from beneath the film.

Wrap the squeegee in a lint-free cloth and run it across the entire window. The cloth will absorb any remaining application solution. Use the cloth to wipe down door trims and paint. If any bubbles or fingers of trapped air or application solution remain in the film, use a heat gun to gently warm the area and then run the squeegee over the bubbles toward the closest edge of the window. Repeat this process for all windows until the job is complete.

For the cost of a few basic tools and materials, a DIY car tint is a worthwhile project. You'll save plenty of money and have a better insulated car.
NickBro is offline  
post #5 of 5 Old 06-11-2017, 03:46 AM
Member
 
Greg Smith's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Dubai
Posts: 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by NickBro View Post
For the cost of a few basic tools and materials, a DIY car tint is a worthwhile project. You'll save plenty of money and have a better insulated car.
Well, you said it right there. I would also advise this one because you'll not only save a great amount of money but you'll also have additional knowledge that you can use in your car maintenance
Greg Smith is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the BMW 4-Series Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Window to the Future of BMW bird The Car Lounge 3 06-30-2016 06:21 AM
remote control your car: automatic car window closer Eugene Sherbin Maintenance 1 04-16-2015 11:28 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome